Labyrinth Research Bibliography

Bibliography of Studies Related to Labyrinth Research (.pdf 517K)

This downloadable Bibliography has all entries sorted by author. The entries in the bibliography have been categorized below by topic and also by type (doctoral dissertation, journal article etc.).

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Mariscotti, J. & Texter, L.

Abstract: This study employed a pretest/posttest design in which a total of 165 participants responded to the Jonathan Smith relaxation inventories to explore the similarities and differences in reported responses and levels of relaxation among three groups of participants: (1) those who walked a labyrinth while listening to music [83 participants total, 21 of whom walked a seven-circuit labyrinth and 62 of whom walked an 11-circuit labyrinth]; (2) those who only listened to music and did not walk [31 participants] and (3) those who walked without following a set path and without listening to music [51 participants]. Using the states measured by the Smith relaxation inventories, those participants who only listened to music reported higher levels of sleepiness, disengagement, physical relaxation and mental relaxation as well as lower levels of somatic stress and worry. Those participants who walked without following a set path and without listening to music reported higher levels of sleepiness, mental quiet and physical relaxation. Of the participants who walked a labyrinth while listening to music, those who walked a seven-circuit labyrinth reported higher levels of physical relaxation, mental quiet, and timelessness or joy, as well as lower levels of somatic stress and worry. Those who walked an 11-circuit labyrinth reported higher levels of disengagement, physical relaxation, mental quiet, peace, and love and thankfulness as well as lower levels of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotions. According to the researchers, this study is part of the important process of establishing empirical evidence to support that walking the labyrinth leads to many of the relaxation benefits of other accepted relaxation techniques and that the labyrinth also is useful for spiritual exploration and growth.

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